Allowance: Tweens & Teens

They're ready to take ownership of their chores and do more to earn more.

Tween Mowing Lawn

Before diving in, read this overview of the whole strategy for important details and review finding your child’s nature

Sponges: get creative with household chores for the kids.

Chores & Earn: from 10 through 12 kids can adhere to some routines that help the household function better. The tasks they once helped you with now become chores that are their responsibility. When children have ownership and responsibility they have things to trade; the more entrepreneurial among your family may end up doing all the work, but they might end up with all the money, too. (A good book: Lunch Money by Andrew Clements about a kid who makes a fortune off his older siblings.) In this stage you are helping them with chores that are under their purview. “Let me help you (insert chore),” or “how can I help you XYZ” are a great means to give them jump-start getting something done. A slight increase in allowance will empower and enable them to start buying the things they want, like specific clothes or shoes, that you were likely to purchase anyway.

Suggested amount: $10+, customized to your family.

Suggested expectations: their ownership of their chores should come with a new level of quality and few reminders.

 

kids on swing rideWork & Save: in early adolescence children go through another great developmental leap. From ages 13 to 15 they are far more socially aware, and often they want to buy the cool stuff or go to awesome places but don’t have the money. Now is a time to impress upon them the idea of having a financial goal and working to earn money over and above what they, and you, have come to expect. Doing more voluntarily because they have needs and desires should be encouraged. You’ll need to support creativity and expose them to more and more of your finances and financial decisions. Kids in this stage can learn to do more at home and venture outside the home to earn extra money. They are primarily interested in fitting in and being a part of a peer group, so they are beginning to respond less to what you say and pay more attention to what you do. Speak less and work along with them more. Pay them with cash and open a bank account for them to put a portion of their earnings into savings. They may ask for more work only occasionally, but you can offer opportunities to earn more money.

Suggested amounts: customize fairly according to job.

Suggested expectations: (clear communication is critical), vacuum & wash the car, clean the windows, vacuum & dust the house, watch younger siblings, mow the lawn. Outside the home: babysitting, yard work & mowing, pet-sitting, etc.

 

Disclosures: The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. They do not necessarily reflect the views of LPL Financial.

 

 

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